Cart:

(0)

1 oz American Platinum Eagle Coins

40 80 120
Top Pick
2022 1 oz American Platinum Eagle Coin BU
2022 1 oz American Platinum Eagle Coin BU
$1,119.79
As Low As
Quantity Check/Wire
1 - 19 $1,129.79
20 - 99 $1,124.79
100 + $1,119.79
2022 1 oz American Platinum Eagle (MD® Premier + PCGS FS®)
2022 1 oz American Platinum Eagle (MD® Premier + PCGS FS®)
$1,139.79
As Low As
Quantity Check/Wire
1 - 19 $1,149.79
20 - 99 $1,144.79
100 + $1,139.79
2021 1 oz American Platinum Eagle Coin BU
2021 1 oz American Platinum Eagle Coin BU
$1,209.79
As Low As
Quantity Check/Wire
1 - 19 $1,229.79
20 - 99 $1,219.79
100 + $1,209.79

The Popularity of 1 oz Platinum Eagles

Since their introduction, 1 oz Platinum American Eagle coins have become one of the world's most widely-traded Platinum coins in the world. Released in 1997 from the U.S. Mint sponsored by the United States government, the obverse features the Statue of Liberty, a symbol of freedom to the United States. The reverse depicts an American Eagle signifying the strength and security of the United States. Platinum Eagles are available in 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, and 1/10 oz denominations, with face values of $100, $50, $25, and $10.

The Platinum Eagle coin is a popular choice for investors and collectors because of its beauty and purity. Platinum is a rare metal that is highly sought after for its many uses, making the Platinum Eagle coin a valuable investment.

The coins are also available in different denominations, so they can be tailored to fit any budget. Additionally, the United States Mint only produces a limited number of Platinum Eagles each year, making them a rare and valuable commodity.

If you're looking for a beautiful and valuable Platinum coin, the 1 oz Platinum Eagle is a great choice. These coins are sure to increase in value over time, so they make a wise investment option. They are also great for collectors, as they feature stunning designs that are sure to please. If you're looking for a unique and beautiful Platinum coin, the 1 oz Platinum Eagle is a great option.

These coins are sure to increase in value over time, so they make a wise investment option. They are also great for collectors, as they feature stunning designs that are sure to please.


Platinum Eagle Design

The obverse of the Platinum American Eagle features the Statue of Liberty, a symbol of freedom to the United States and all who see her. The reverse design depicts a bald eagle signifying the strength and security of the United States. With these patriotic designs, the American Platinum Eagle coin celebrates the pride and patriotism of the United States.

The Platinum eagle coin was first introduced in 1997, making it one of the youngest coins in the American Eagle series. It was originally struck only in proof quality, but a bullion version was added in 1998. The Platinum eagle coin is available in 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz, and 1/10 troy ounce sizes.

The Platinum Eagle coin has a face value of $100, but it’s worth much more than that. In fact, the Platinum eagle coin is one of the most valuable coins in the world! It’s currently worth around $1,400 per ounce.

If you’re looking for a beautiful and unique coin, the Platinum American Eagle is a perfect choice. With its stunning design and high value, it’s sure to impress!

PCGS & NGC 1 Oz Certified Platinum Eagle

APMEX carries a selection of certified 1 oz American Platinum Eagle coins. These stunning Platinum coins have been graded by industry leaders, PCGS and NGC. The grade adds to the collectible value of these beautiful coins from the U.S. Mint. Get your hands on a certified 1 oz Platinum Eagle today!

The market for certified coins is gaining in popularity. Certified coins have been sent to a professional grading organization such as the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) or Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) for a coin's authenticity and grade evaluation by experts.

The service places the coin in a plastic holder (also known as a "slab"), which is then viewable through the clear plastic that is sealed in such a way that it is unbreakable without injuring the holder, making tampering obvious. The holder includes a label containing a unique serial number and details about the coin, various holograms, and other counterfeit deterrent features.

A trustworthy seller has certified coins that have been accepted on a national level as a standard, and they are frequently bought sight-unseen based on the market's confidence in the information revealed on the label sealed within the holder. However, while certified coins have several advantages, certain collectors prefer to collect either part or all of their collections uncertified (also known as 'raw' or 'uncertified'). Below are some reasons why collectors may prefer one over the other:
  • Protection: Certificated protectors, without a doubt, provide better protection than nearly any other commercially available option.
  • Re-Sale: In terms of both ability and simplicity, certified coins are usually simpler to resell.
  • Guarantee: Limited warranties are offered on the workmanship and authenticity of what has been encapsulated by various high-quality grading services.
  • Grade/Authenticity: Certification from a reputable source eliminates the guesswork in grading coins and determining whether they are genuine.
  • Storage: For neatly organizing a collection, hard plastic boxes that contain verified coins in rows are a popular choice.


There are also benefits to raw or uncertified coins. Some of those include:

  • Cost: Certifying a coin might be more expensive than the value of the coin.
  • Problem Coins: Although only genuine certificates are now available, for years the most reputable grading companies refused to encapsulate problematic coins.
  • Storage: Plastic boxes for certified coins are a good way to store coins, but they are bulky and don't look nice on display. The use of albums is another uncertified technique that may be used to showcase coins.
  • Attribution: Collectors enjoy having their own information on coin labels, but the services are restricted as to what is deemed "recognized" when certifying coins.
  • Album Collectors: Many people still prefer the bookshelf album method of collecting, and certification is not a good fit for it.


Whatever a collector decides to collect is acceptable; neither is correct or incorrect depending on the circumstances of what they collect. In reality, many collectors choose to collect both certified and non-certified coins. Whatever method you use, keep in mind to safeguard your collection by keeping an up-to-date inventory of your holdings, adequately insure the collection against loss, and store the collection in an environmentally controlled location.


The History of Platinum

Platinum is a relatively new metal, having only been discovered in 1735 by Spanish explorer Antonio de Ulloa. For many years it was used mainly for jewelry and other decorative purposes because of its beautiful silvery-white color. However, it wasn't until the 19th century that Platinum's true value began to be realized.

Platinum's industrial applications began to be developed in the early 1800s, and by the mid-1900s it was being used in a wide variety of industries, including petroleum refining, chemical processing, and electrical wiring. Today, Platinum is still used in many of these same industries, as well as in automotive catalytic converters and jewelry.

Supply and Demand

Most of the world's Platinum is produced in South Africa, with Russia and Canada being the next largest producers. These three countries account for about 70% of the world's total Platinum supply.

Platinum is a very rare metal, which contributes to its high value. It is estimated that there are only about 170,000 metric tons of Platinum in the world. In comparison, there are about 190,000 metric tons of Gold and about 5 million metric tons of Silver.

The limited supply of Platinum, combined with increasing industrial demand, has caused the price of Platinum to rise significantly in recent years.


Investing in Platinum

Investing in Platinum can be a challenge because it is not as widely traded as other Precious Metals like Gold and Silver. However, there are a few ways that investors can get exposure to Platinum.

One way to invest in Platinum is through exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that track the price of the metal. ETFs are a type of investment fund that trades on stock exchanges and can be bought and sold like stocks.

Another way to invest in Platinum is by purchasing stocks of companies that mine or produce the metal. These companies are located all over the world, with the majority of them being in South Africa, Russia, and Canada.

Investors should be aware that there are a few risks associated with investing in Platinum. The first is that Platinum prices are very volatile and can fluctuate significantly from year to year. For example, the price of Platinum fell from a high of $2,252 per ounce in 2008 to a low of $786 per ounce in 2009 during the global financial crisis.

Another risk to consider is that most of the world's Platinum is produced in just a few countries, which can make it difficult to get exposure to the metal if you're not based in one of those countries. For example, South Africa accounted for about 75% of the world's Platinum production in 2013, so investing in a South African company would give you much more exposure to Platinum than investing in a company that produces other metals.

Finally, it's important to remember that Platinum is a very rare metal and its supply is limited. This means that prices could potentially rise very high if demand for the metal increases faster than new supplies can be brought to market.

Before you invest in any Precious Metal, it is essential that you consult with your financial advisor first.




155K+ Customer Reviews
4.9/5 Overall Satisfaction Rating
Check out what other customers are saying.

Items in Cart (0)


There are no items in the cart.

APXIIS02