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$1,000 FRN's (1928 & 1934)

$1,000 FRN's (1928 & 1934)
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Do they Make $1000 Bills?

$1000 bills are no longer made. They were last printed on December 27, 1945, and officially discontinued on July 14, 1969, by the Federal Reserve System, supposedly due to 'lack of use'. Some $1000 bills can be worth several thousand dollars each. Is there really a $10,000 bill? There were Federal Reserve Notes printed in a $10,000 denomination. There are only 366 still in existence, and one can expect to pay more than $150,000 to add such an item to one's collection.

Federal Reserve Notes FAQ

What determines an old Federal Reserve Note value?

Careful inspection of several factors is required to determine the value of a Federal Reserve Note. Technically speaking, the paper currency still in circulation today is made up of Federal Reserve Notes, including one dollar bills. From a collector’s point of view, however, old notes carry the most value. That is why the year printed on the face is one of the primary factors that determine the value. The condition of any Federal Reserve Note is essential, along with the mint mark, face value, and total number that were initially printed. These factors are all similar to those that are used for numismatic coins, although the rating systems are slightly different for paper money versus Precious Metal pieces.

What does the Federal Reserve Bank letters code stand for?

The Federal Reserve Bank letters code is a list of letters and numbers that represent where that particular note was printed. Throughout the United States, there are twelve banks authorized to print currency in American dollars. You can find a letter code to the left of President Washington’s portrait on a $1 bill. It also appears in the prefix of the serial number. The Federal Reserve Bank letter assignments are as follows: A. Boston, B. New York, C. Philadelphia, D. Cleveland, E. Richmond, F. Atlanta, G. Chicago, H. St. Louis.

Where can I find rare American currency?

The exciting thing about rare American currency is that it can be found almost anywhere. Any note that was printed by a U.S. Federal Reserve Bank still carries its value. Therefore, thousands if not millions of collectible bills are still in circulation. Because you can easily store currency in safety deposit boxes, fireproof strongboxes, or even coffee cans, the places to find a rare piece of U.S. currency are limitless. Your best chance of owning a rare example of American money, however, is by purchasing an authenticated bill from a reputable seller such as APMEX. Our Federal Reserve Notes are all verified for their collectible value, and come fully verified for condition and legitimacy.

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